Risk & Safety

The California Department of Toxic Substances (CADTSC) is the home of the California Nanotechnology Initiative, however their efforts are now considered part of their pollution prevention program. The main initiatives of this organization have been a series of two call-ins for companies identified as working with nanotechnology:

California Department of Toxic Substances Control (CADTSC): Nanomaterial Call-ins

Round #1: Carbon Nanotubes

(2010)

What: Manufacturers who produce or import carbon nanotubes in California, or who may export carbon nanotubes into California were required to reply to a formal request by the DTSC on their involvement with CNTs. A total of 26 companies and organizations were included on the list.

  • Call-in Letter: outlined the scope of the project and the time frame to respond required under the law
  • Contact List: 26 companies and organizations: includes address and contact name (Website PDF Link)
  • Results: a link to the document submitted by each company or organization is provided on this page (Website Link)
  • Bibliography (Website PDF Link)
Round #2: Nanometal, Nanometal Oxide, and Quantum Dot

(2011)

What: DTSC sent a letter to manufacturers and importers on December 21, 2010. DTSC formally requested information regarding the chemical and physical properties, including analytical test methods and other relevant information for these six specific nanomaterials: nano cerium oxide, nano silver, nano titanium dioxide, nano zero valent iron, nano zinc oxide, and quantum dots. A total of 45 unique companies and organizations were contacted (more are listed on the sheets, but multiple contacts at one location or multiple divisions listed).

  • Call-in Letter (Website PDF Link)
  • Contact List: 40 unique companies and organizations: includes address, contact name (Website PDF Link)
  • Contact List Addendum: 5 additional companies and organizations (mostly of universities) were sent a letter on January 4, 2011 (Website PDF Link)
  • Results: a link to the document submitted by each company or organization is provided on this page (Website Link)
  • Bibliography (Website PDF Link)
  • Article in New Haven Independent: California Wants to Know More About Nano-Metals (2011)

Important Note: DTSC's data call-in authority, Assembly Bill 289, defines a 'manufacturer' subject to reporting under the law as: "a person who produces a chemical in this state or who imports a chemical into this state for sale in this state." California Health & Safety Code 57018(a)(4). Based on this definition, some stakeholders contacted were not legally obligated to reply. Using this definition, the following stakeholders are included and excluded:

  • Includes:
    • Stakeholders that manufacturer nanomaterials with production facilities in California (includes nanomaterials produced for internal-use or for commercial or industrial sale)
    • Stakeholders that import nanomaterials into California and sell the nanomaterial in California
  • Excludes:
    • Stakeholders that import nanomaterials into California but do not sell the nanomaterial in California (internal-use)
    • Stakeholders that import nanomaterials into California, and resell them outside of California (distributor) (commercial or industrial sale)
    • Stakeholders that purchase nanomaterials in California, but do not resell the nanomaterial in California (internal-use)
    • Stakeholders that purchase nanomaterials in California, and resell them outside of California (distributor) (commercial or industrial sale)
    • Stakeholders that purchase nanomaterials in California, and resell them in California (commercial or industrial sale)
    • Stakeholders with headquarters, R&D, service centers related to nanomaterials in California, but no production facilities and do not import their nanomaterials into California for sale in California

Supporting Organizations in California

  • UCLA: Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEIN)